Recently Filed Cases

Syndicate content
| United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts
Zebra Enterprise Solutions Changes Venue and Files for Declaratory Judgment

On June 10, 2015, Lynx Systems Developers Inc. (“Lynx”) sued Zebra Enterprise Solutions Corp. (“Zebra”) in the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts for a number of claims including misappropriation of trade secrets, breach of contract, and fraud. The dispute between the two parties stemmed from a joint venture the parties engaged in to build a system that would track NFL football players’ actions in real time using hardware installed in players’ shoulder pads. The business relationship between the parties disintegrated and the parties then developed competing tracking systems independently. After Zebra won a contract with the NFL, Lynx brought the initial suit in Massachusetts District Court.

Last week, in response to the complaint, Zebra filed a motion to dismiss the suit in Massachusetts District Court and on August 20, 2015, brought a new complaint against Lynx in Santa Clara County Superior Court in Santa Clara, California. Zebra’s complaint pleads for declaratory relief of no (1) trade secret misappropriation, (2) breach of contract, (3) interference with existing and advantageous business relationships, (4) fraud, (5) breach of fiduciary duty, (6) unfair competition or unfair or deceptive acts, (7) unjust enrichment, (8) conversion, and (9) intentional interference with prospective contractual and advantageous business and economic relationships. The California case is filed under docket number 115CV284620.

| United States District Court for the Central District of California
Doll Designer Alleges Hasbro Violated DTSA with “My Little Pony”

Plaintiff Elinor Shapiro (“Shapiro”) alleges that Defendant Hasbro, Inc. (“Hasbro”) misappropriated her trade secrets regarding new versions of the popular doll “My Little Pony.” Shapiro works as a doll creator and made a submission to Hasbro for a new line of pony dolls that are clear, filled with glitter, and light up. The submission included a presentation, marketing plan, and prototypes. Roughly 17 months later, Hasbro released a new line of “My Little Pony” dolls that are clear, light up and filled with different colored glitters. Shapiro argues that this was a misappropriation of information she presented, and has filed two lawsuits against Hasbro.

Shapiro’s first lawsuit, Shapiro v. Hasbro Inc. et al.,, No. 2:15-cv-02964, which is set to go to trial in September 2016, alleges multiple claims including copyright infringement, breach of contract, and multiple California trade secret law violations. Shapiro filed the second lawsuit, Shapiro v. Hasbro Inc. et al., No. 2:16-cv-05750, on August 2, 2016. The second suit drops the copyright infringement claims and focuses more on trade secrets, including a claim under the Defend Trade Secrets Act (DTSA), which took effect in May 2016.

The complaint for Shapiro’s latest lawsuit can be found here: http://tsi.brooklaw.edu/cases/shapiro-v-hasbro-inc-et-al/filings/shapiro-v-hasbro-inc-et-al

| California Superior Court of San Francisco County
Employee Sues Google for Overbroad Confidentiality Agreements

Plaintiff “John Doe,” a project manager at Google, sued the company in California State Court, claiming they illegally require employees to sign broad confidentiality agreements. Doe filed the complaint in the California Superior Court of San Francisco County on December 20, 2016.

The agreements essentially state that Google employees cannot disclose any company information that is not generally known with anyone, including other Google employees. According to the complaint, these confidentiality agreements are contrary to state law because they can prevent employees from discussing their wages or disclosing information to government agencies. Furthermore, the complaint alleges that Google enforces its confidentiality policy through an internal program called “Stopleaks” which essentially asks employees to spy on each other and report any disclosure of confidential information.

Google defends the confidentiality agreements as an attempt to protect sensitive company information and maintains it is committed to maintaining an open culture within the company.

The case is Doe vs. Google Inc. et al., Docket No. CGC16556034 (Cal. Super. Ct. Dec. 20, 2016). A copy of Doe’s complaint can be found here: http://tsi.brooklaw.edu/cases/doe-vs-google-inc-et-al/filings/employee-sues-google-overbroad-confidentiality-agreements

Syndicate content