Tradesman International, Inc. v. Black

11-3715, 12-2032
September 25, 2012
Federal Court
7th Circuit
Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit

§ 4 of the UTSA provides that “[i]f a claim of misappropriation is made in bad faith . . . the court may award reasonable attorney’s fees to the prevailing party.” A recent decision by the Seventh Circuit suggests that this provision applies to suits maintained in bad faith, even when the initial claim may have been meritorious.

In Tradesman, International, Inc. v. Black, a Seventh Circuit panel reversed and remanded a decision of the District Court for the Central District of Illinois denying a request of attorney's fees. The district court found that while the plaintiff had not initiated the suit in bad faith, bad faith had developed over the course of the litigation, as it became clear that the plaintiff’s claims were without merit. Nonetheless, the district court found that the phrase “made in bad faith” in UTSA § 4 applied only to the initial filing of a lawsuit, and denied the request accordingly

In reversing, the Seventh Circuit took a broader “common sense” reading of § 4, holding that “[a] claim is made in bad faith [under UTSA § 4] when it is initiated in bad faith, maintained in bad faith, or both.” The Seventh Circuit's decision suggests a new avenue for collecting attorneys' fees in trade secret cases.

Hamilton, kanne, tinder
INC., Tradesman International
John Black
Uniform Trade Secrets Act

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