Cases from Superior Court of California

County of San Francisco, Superior Court of California
Jawbone Obtains Preliminary Injunction Against Rival Fitbit in Trade Secrets Dispute

On October 13 2015, San Francisco Superior Court Judge Harold Kahn issued a preliminary injunction, ordering five Fitbit employees who had formerly worked at Jawbone to return Jawbone confidential information they took before leaving. Judge Kahn agreed with Jawbone that the information taken constituted confidential information and that these employees likely breached their confidentiality agreements with Jawbone when they provided the confidential information to their new employer, Fitbit.

This is the first opinion in the ongoing legal battle between rival wearable fitness tracker makers, Fitbit and Jawbone. Since May 2015, Jawbone has filed three complaints against Fitbit, and in turn, Fitbit has filed two complaints against Jawbone.

In May 2015, Jawbone owner Aliphcom Corp. sued rival Fitbit after its announcement of its initial public offering in California State Court. In an effort to “decimate” Jawbone, Jawbone alleged that Fitbit poached its employees and stole its trade secrets. Per the initial Complaint, Jawbone alleged that Fitbit contacted roughly 30 percent of its workforce in early 2015 and of those contacted, at least five employees had left Jawbone to work for Fitbit. Before leaving, Jawbone alleged that these employees downloaded sensitive information - which included business plans, research, product plans, services, customer lists and data - stored it on thumb drives, and then provided it to their new employer, Fitbit.

In June 2015, a week before Fitbit’s IPO, Jawbone filed a second lawsuit in California federal court, alleging that each of Fitbit’s products infringed at least one of three Jawbone patents. Then, in July 2015, Jawbone petitioned the U.S. International Trade Commission to block imports of Fitbit’s products, alleging patent infringement. In August 2015, the ITC posted a short notice online stating that the agency will investigate whether Fitbit has been importing infringing fitness tracking devices.

In response, on September 3rd, Fitbit Inc. accused Jawbone of patent infringement in a suit filed in Delaware federal court and then on September 8th, Fitbit filed another patent infringement suit in California federal court.

Santa Clara County, Superior Court of California
PayPal files suit against Google for misappropriation of trade secrets after Google woos over a former PayPal senior executive

Paypal, Inc. (“PayPal”) and eBay, Inc. (“eBay) sued Google, Inc. (“Google”) and Osama Bedier, a former PayPal senior executive, alleging that Bedier and Google misappropriated PayPal’s confidential marketing research, point-of-sale (“POS”) technology and services for retailers, and mobile payment strategies and procedures.

Before the suit, PayPal sought to serve as a payment option for mobile app purchases on Google’s Android market. Bedier was then the senior executive leading negotiations between PayPal and Google to set up the business relationship. However, during the final steps of the negotiations, Bedier interviewed for a position at Google without notice to PayPal. He terminated employment at PayPal and began work for Google’s Mobile Payments division on January 24, 2011. PayPal alleges that Bedier left the company with knowledge of its trade secrets for retail POS technology and services and mobile payment. Additionally, it claims that Bedier transferred and possessed upon departure PayPal’s and eBay’s confidential information on his personal computers.

Superior Court of California
TCW and Gundlach settle their dispute over allegedly stolen trade secrets

TCW Group Inc. and Jeffrey Gundlach, its former chief investment officer, announced on Thursday, December 29, 2011, that they had settled a lawsuit over Gundlach’s firing in 2009 and allegations he stole trade secrets to set up his own firm. The terms of the settlement agreement were said to be confidential and the parties would not discuss them. Litigation and damages assessments had not concluded at the time of the settlement, but a jury had previously made preliminary findings.

On August 20, 2011, after seven weeks of trial and two days of deliberation, the California jury in the case between TCW and Jeffrey Gundlach, a former employee, concluded that Mr. Gundlach did technically misappropriate trade secrets and breach his fiduciary duty to the company. But the jury awarded his former employer nothing in damages, finding that Mr. Gundlach’s breach of duty had caused no harm to his former employer. The jury also found that Mr. Gundlach had intentionally interfered with contracts, but that TCW had not been harmed; they awarded no damages on that issue, either.

However, the jury determined TCW had withheld wages from Mr. Gundlach in violation of the state labor code, and found TCW liable to Gundlach for nearly $67 million in back-pay.

TCW may yet recover damages on the trade secrets count; damages for the jury’s finding of misappropriation will be determined by Judge West. TCW is seeking about $89 million for the trade secrets theft. However, the jury’s determination that the theft had not been willful and malicious ruled out an award of punitive damages.

TCW had filed an amended complaint for misappropriation of trade secrets, conspiracy and aiding and abetting in the theft of trade secrets, and common law unfair competition, among other claims, on February 09, 2011. The amended complaint followed a January rejection by Judge West of TCW's claims that the DoubleLine Fund Trust and its trustees had stolen trade secrets and engaged in unfair competition, saying the firm had failed to state a factual basis to support the allegations in its complaint.

TCW's first complaint in this action came nearly a year after the company originally sued Gundlach for breach of fiduciary duty, unfair competition, misappropriation of trade secrets and civil conspiracy, among other claims. Gundlach was TCW's former investment chief who launched DoubleLine Capital LP after being fired from TCW in December 2009.

The second lawsuit targeted a trust associated with Gundlach's investment firm. Like the previous suit, the second complaint claimed that Gundlach worked to steal TCW's data, including contact and holdings data for clients. If printed out, the allegedly stolen information would amount to roughly 9 million pages, according to TCW's suit. The trustees are also named in the second suit based on allegations that they knew that Gundlach and his co-conspirators had stolen confidential, proprietary information from TCW and that DoubleLine would use that material to manage the trust's mutual funds. The complaint included allegations of misappropriation of trade secrets, unfair competition, conspiracy to steal trade secrets, unjust enrichment and other related state law claims.