Cases from Jeffrey S. White

Northern District of California
After Husband Convicted in Dupont Economic Espionage Case, Wife Gets Probation

On September 29th, 2015, Judge White of a California federal district court accepted Christina Liew’s plea agreement, sentencing her to three years of probation and restitution to the IRS in the amount of $6 million. As part of the plea agreement, Ms. Liew pled guilty to conspiracy to tampering with evidence. Her Husband, Walter Liew, was the first person to be convicted of economic espionage by a U.S. jury in March 2014 and was sentenced to 15 years in prison.

Walter Liew was found guilty of economic espionage and trade secret theft after selling DuPont's coveted titanium dioxide (TiO2) recipe to Chinese state-owned entities. The highly guarded DuPont recipe was used for both the Oreo cream recipe, as well as the manufacturing of paper and plastics.

U.S. District Court California Northern District (San Francisco)
Federal Jury Convicts On Espionage Act Charges Regarding Theft of Oreo Whitening Recipe

On March 5th, 2014, a federal jury convicted Walter Lian-Heen Liew and Maegerle of economic espionage, theft of trade secrets and other charges for theft of a coveted recipe developed by DuPont which is used to whiten the cream inside Oreos. This recipe for titanium dioxide (TiO2), which can also be used for the manufacture of paper and plastic products as well, had been a closely guarded DuPont secret despite longstanding efforts by Chinese to acquire a similar recipe. This process, which uses chloride, is highly regarded as a cleaner and more efficient process than the standard industry practice of using sulfates in the manufacturing process. Historically, DuPont has taken great measures to keep this formula as a trade secret.
According to testimony from trial, Mr. Maegerle, an engineer who had been with DuPont for 35 years, disclosed the recipe to Mr. Liew who had set up a California company with the intention of producing TiO2 and selling it to the Chinese. Mr. Liew had entered into contracts with Chinese state-owned entities regarding projects which involved the use of this TiO2 technology for manufacturing purposes. After obtaining the trade secret, the defendants sold it for over $20 million.
This is the first federal jury conviction under the Espionage Act of 1996 which provides no private cause of action, but offers the government a powerful weapon in protecting intellectual property interests in the U.S. Sentencing for these individuals is scheduled for June 10, 2014 and it will be interesting to follow since there is no precedent.

United States District Court for the Northern District of California
Federal prosecutors indict a state-owned Chinese company and its executive on charges of conspiracy to steal DuPont’s trade secrets

On February 7, 2012, in a rare action, federal prosecutors indicted Pangang Group Limited Company (“Pangang”), a state-owned steel manufacturer in China, and a Pangang executive on charges of conspiracy to steal DuPont’s trade secrets about titanium dioxide technology in violation of the Economic Espionage Act (EEA), 18 U.S.C. §1831 et seq. This indictment supercedes a 2011 indictment in which federal prosecutors originally charged Californians Walter and Christina Liew with witness tampering and making false statements in a federal criminal investigation into the alleged trade secrets theft. DuPont is the world’s largest manufacturer of chloride-route titanium dioxide, a white pigment used in paint, plastics and paper, and defendants allegedly made a “long-running effort” to obtain DuPont’s trade secrets about the process to benefit Chinese companies. Arraignment is scheduled for March 1, 2012.

United States District Court for the Northern District of California
Man sentenced for theft of Trade Secrets from DuPont

Walter Liew was sentenced to 15 years in prison, and fined $28 million following his conviction under the Economic Espionage Act. The conviction arose from the theft of trade secrets from DuPont, particularly information and documents pertaining to the production process of a white pigment, titanium dioxide (TiO2). The pigment is what DuPont uses to achieve its whitest whites in everything from cars to paper.

Judge White, writing in the Northern District of California on a post-conviction motion for acquittal, explained that the evidence demonstrating the intent to injure Dupont, and intent to benefit a foreign government was sufficient for a rational juror to find Liew guilty. It was also noted that the money was tracked to various accounts in Singapore and China, but could not be recovered.